Breast Cancer Updates

 

Breast Cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women. It does not choose by age and all women are at risk. New discoveries and studies can help in the prevention as well as treatment of this disease.

Breast Cancer UpdatesHigh-Fat Diets in Puberty Linked To Breast Cancer

“Young women approaching puberty could reduce their risk of breast cancer if they avoid high-fat diets, researchers from Michigan State University claim.

The research, published in the current online issue of Breast Cancer Research, suggests that eating a diet high in saturated animal fats not only speeds up the development of breast cancer, but also may increase the risk of developing the disease.

Experimenting on mice, the researchers from the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program at Michigan State University (MSU) found that just 3 weeks after embarking on the high-fat diet, mice showed changes in the breast, including increased cell growth and alterations in the immune cells.”

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Breast Cancer UpdatesNew Hope for Inflammatory Breast Cancer: Rare But Fast Growing

“Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), which can also be Stage stage III or Stage stage IV breast cancer, is the least common but most aggressive type of breast cancer. While only 1 to 4 percent of newly diagnosed cases are IBC, 60 to 70 percent of all women with the disease do not live five years beyond their diagnosis.

The Look and Feel of IBC
Unlike other breast cancers, IBC does not present itself as a lump, but as inflammation. The symptoms a patient typically notices or feels include:

Sudden swelling of a breast, which may look red, or feel itchy or warm;
Ridges or raised or pitted marks (like the appearance of an orange peel) on breast skin;
Nipple retraction or discharge; and/or
Swollen lymph nodes in the underarm or above the collarbone.”

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Breast Cancer UpdatesDiscovery Sheds New Light On Aggressiveness of Certain Breast Cancers

“In a discovery that sheds new light on the aggressiveness of certain breast cancers, Whitehead Institute researchers have identified a transcription factor, known as ZEB1, that is capable of converting non-aggressive basal-type cancer cells into highly malignant, tumor-forming cancer stem cells (CSCs). Intriguingly, luminal breast cancercells, which are associated with a much better clinical prognosis, carry this gene in a state in which it seems to be permanently shut down.

The researchers, whose findings are published this week in the journal Cell, report that the ZEB1 gene is held in a poised state in basal non-CSCs, such that it can readily respond to environmental cues that consequently drive those non-CSCs into the dangerous CSC state. Basal-type breast carcinoma is a highly aggressive form of breast cancer. According to a 2011 epidemiological study, the 5-year survival rate for patients with basal breast cancer is 76%, compared with a roughly 90% 5-year survival rate among patients with other forms of breast cancer.”

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Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris was born in Europe but has lived in the US for many years. He attended college both in Europe and the US and completed medical school at the University of Texas. Residency and fellowship in oncology was completed at Baylor. Read More...
Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton