More Breast Cancer Survivors Are Receiving Reconstruction After Mastectomies

 

Before considering breast reconstruction, women need to get enough information so they can ask questions about their options. It is important that they know the process, what to expect after surgery, and what the healing time will be.

More Breast Cancer Survivors Are Receiving Reconstruction After MastectomiesSix weeks after her mother died of ovarian cancer, Elizabeth Stower, then 21, was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, 235,030 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and 40,430 will die from the disease. For survivors who undergo a mastectomy, life after cancer can be especially hard, mentally and physically, as they deal with a new body image. A new study by researchers from private practices and academic medical centers shows that more women are receiving breast reconstruction after mastectomies, but the rates also vary dramatically based on geographic location.

For Stower, the decision to have reconstruction surgery was immediate. During almost a year of treatment that included four rounds of chemotherapy, followed by six weeks of radiation, she had spacers placed in her chest to stretch the skin and make room for the placement of the implants.

“Now that I’m healthy again, that part of my body sort of signals health,” says Stower, now 27 and working in Washington, D.C. “If I didn’t have reconstruction, it would be a permanent reminder that something was stolen.”

Read More.

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris was born in Europe but has lived in the US for many years. He attended college both in Europe and the US and completed medical school at the University of Texas. Residency and fellowship in oncology was completed at Baylor. Read More...
Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton