My Battle Against Triple Negative Cancer

 

Triple negative cancer due to BRCA1 genetic mutation is an aggressive disease and is very rare.  The challenges one faces with this disease are immense and never ending.  One brave soul talks about her experience and the importance of why  continuous study should be done to understand this disease.

My battle against Triple Negative Cancer“When something is wrong, I can feel it in my gut. Whether it be the way a radiology technician looks at me, the way a doctor walks in my exam room, feeling a lump on my body, waking up with a headache every morning or getting lost in a familiar place. When something is wrong, I always know before the test results need to be read out loud to me.

I was diagnosed with stage IIB triple negative breast cancer two years ago when I was just 30 years old. I learned I had the disease after feeling a lump, going to the doctor, having a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsies. I was devastated because I had no family history of breast cancer; only after my diagnosis did I find out I have the BRCA1 genetic mutation, which is closely linked to triple negative breast cancer. I endured a double mastectomy and reconstruction, 16 rounds of aggressive chemotherapy and 25 zaps of radiation. But that was not enough treatment to keep this particularly rare and nasty subtype of breast cancer out my body.

In November 2013, about a year after I finished treatment, I went to the doctor for a routine ultrasound of my ovaries. The BRCA1 mutation put me at an 87 percent risk of developing breast cancer, and it also put me at a 44 percent risk of developing ovarian cancer. After the test, the technician left the room but told me not to get dressed. I knew something was off. When she came back into the room, she told me to get dressed and I would get the results from my gynecologist. ”

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Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris was born in Europe but has lived in the US for many years. He attended college both in Europe and the US and completed medical school at the University of Texas. Residency and fellowship in oncology was completed at Baylor. Read More...
Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton