Signs, Symptoms and Treatments of Breast Cancer

 

By: Dr. Chris Charlton

Signs, Symptoms and Treatments of Breast Cancer Breast cancer detection is one of the most highly advertised forms of disease prevention. This is because one out of every eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in her life. Those numbers are staggering. This is a very pervasive disease.

Fortunately, the five year survival rate for breast cancer patients is over 90% when cancer cells are found in the early stages of breast cancer. This number is also impressive. It gives hope for all women and a very good incentive for preventative care. It is recommended that all women over the age of 30 have an annual mammogram. This is only part of the doctor recommended preventative care. In order to do your best to prevent breast cancer you can live an active healthy lifestyle including exercise and a healthy diet.

Be sure to ask questions to your doctor when you go in to his or her office for your annual mammogram. It is important to know the signs and symptoms of breast cancer. Most women want to be aware on how to check if there are lumps on their breasts. Performing self-breast exams is always a good idea. However, don’t be alarmed if you do find lumps in your breasts. These are not always a sign of breast cancer. In fact, they can be quite normal. Of course you will want to schedule a mammogram if you find one, yet don’t be unduly alarmed. The fact is that breast cancer can begin to grow even when there are no lumps to be found. Some breast cancer signs to look and feel for are swelling in the armpit, pain or tenderness in the breast (more than menstrual cycle breast tenderness), a noticeable flattening or indentation in the breast or nipple, any change in the color or texture of the breast, such as rough pitted skin similar to the skin of an orange, or any unusual discharge coming from the nipple. The discharge may be bloody, clear, or another color. A general rule of thumb is to go to your doctor if you notice anything about your breasts that is different than they have looked or felt like before.

A doctor can diagnose breast cancer through ultrasounds, magnetic resonance imaging, or biopsies of breast tissue. When using an ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, the doctor is looking for lumps that are solid. Lumps that are fluid filled sacs called cysts are not usually cancerous.

When you receive a breast cancer diagnosis, recall the 90% five year survival rate and do not give up hope. Be aware that once you have breast cancer, you will need to be vigilant for the rest of your life, yet treatments have come so far that you will have the tools necessary to fight. From the more invasive treatments of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, to the newer hormone and biological therapies, science has come a long way in the fight against breast cancer.

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris was born in Europe but has lived in the US for many years. He attended college both in Europe and the US and completed medical school at the University of Texas. Residency and fellowship in oncology was completed at Baylor. Read More...
Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton