Smoking Risk: Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

 

Smoking has been linked to a lot of health problems and diseases. The many negative effects can also increase the risk of breast cancer in women.  A new study has found that there is evidence that smokers are also at risk of getting a less common form of breast cancer.

Smoking Risk: Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer“Researchers found that women between 20 and 44 years old who had smoked a pack of cigarettes per day for at least 10 years were 60 percent more likely than those who smoked less to develop so-called estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

Smokers were not more likely to develop a less common form of breast cancer known as triple-negative breast cancer, which tends to be more aggressive.

“I think that there is growing evidence that breast cancer is another health hazard associated with smoking,” Dr. Christopher Li told Reuters Health.
Li is the study’s senior author from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

Previous research has found links between smoking and breast cancer, Li and his colleagues note in the journal Cancer. The studies looking at breast cancer among younger women have produced conflicting results, however.
They also say there are still questions about whether smoking is linked to an increased risk of some types of breast cancer but not others.”

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Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris was born in Europe but has lived in the US for many years. He attended college both in Europe and the US and completed medical school at the University of Texas. Residency and fellowship in oncology was completed at Baylor. Read More...
Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton