What to Do You After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis?

 

What to Do You After a  Breast Cancer DiagnosisThis is often the most frightening time for a person with breast cancer. Knowing you have been with a disease that could potentially end your life can be terrifying.   This time period can be divided into two parts. First: calm down, get adjusted, and allow the news to sink in.  This is the reaction time.  Second: create a plan and make a decision about how to proceed with treatment involving your family and doctors in this process.

“What Should You Do?

Kennedy ended up having both breasts removed, followed by chemotherapy and breast reconstruction. She now counsels newly diagnosed patients as a volunteer for Y-ME, a 24-hour support hotline staffed entirely by breast cancer survivors.

She knows firsthand the importance of being an involved, educated patient, but she says most people need time to come to terms with their diagnosis.

‘It is common for people who have just been diagnosed to be overwhelmed with all the information they are getting and the choices they are being asked to make,’ she says. ‘You are bombarded with facts and figures and statistics, and it is really hard to keep a cool head. But the choices you make are critical and they may impact the rest of your life.’

So what are the most important things newly diagnosed patients can do to maximize their odds of beating cancer? WebMD posed this question to doctors, patient advocates, and cancer survivors, and some common themes emerged. They included:

Get the Facts

Everyone interviewed for this story agreed that education is critical. That means learning all you can about the specifics of your own cancer and how to best treat it. This is especially important for diseases like breast cancer and lymphoma, where treatments vary greatly.

‘I have seen people waste a lot of precious time researching the wrong thing because they didn’t really understand their cancer,’ says Joan Arnim, who manages the patient advocacy program at Houston’s M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. “It is often a good idea to ask your doctor for recommendations about where “

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Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris was born in Europe but has lived in the US for many years. He attended college both in Europe and the US and completed medical school at the University of Texas. Residency and fellowship in oncology was completed at Baylor. Read More...
Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton

Dr. Chris Charlton